Tag Archives: keema

Lamb Curry With Spinach and Onions

Lamb Curry With Spinach and Onions

Lamb Curry With Spinach and Onions

I needed a curry, badly.

More specifically, I needed chillies, because I’ve found that in this life, one thing counts, bird’s eye chillies, large amounts.

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Venison Keema

Venison Keema

Venison Keema

We were supposed to be having lamb. That was the plan, in any case.

I was perusing the fresh meat section, carefully weighing up the pros and cons of various delicious looking cuts that had up until recently been frolicking around a meadow making obscenely cute “baaaaaa” noises, when Paleovirtus Jr. grabbed me by the sleeve and dragged me towards a corner of a refrigerated unit I had previously been unaware of.

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Murgh Keema – Minced Chicken Curry

Murgh Keema - Minced Chicken Curry

Murgh Keema – Minced Chicken Curry

Just recently I cleared out all my old spices – many pre-dated my sejourn in England, meaning they were at least 2 years old.

Then, the other day, I stocked up on some of my absolute favourites – black cumin seed and curry leaves among them. There is something truly wonderful about the aroma given off when these two hit hot oil. I instantly become ravenously hungry!

Once I was back at home with my spicy goodies safely stored away, I began making plans to cook something using them as soon as possible.

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Luscious Leftovers – Brinjal Cutlet and Stuffed Bell Peppers

Brinjal Cutlet

Brinjal Cutlet

My previous post covered Keema Buffad, another variation on the theme of a Keema, an Indian minced meat curry.

Leftover Keema often tastes even better the day after it was cooked.

One of my favourite ways of serving leftover Keema is to use it to stuff vegetables, which are then either grilled ( broiled ) or oven-baked.

Here I use an aubergine ( brinjal in Hindi ) and a bell pepper as the stuffees. The Keema that will be used to stuff the bell pepper will get an additional charge of spinach.

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Keema Buffad – Indian Aromatic Minced Lamb With Lemon and Coconut

Keema Buffad - Indian Aromatic Minced Lamb With Lemon and Coconut

Keema Buffad – Indian Aromatic Minced Lamb With Lemon and Coconut

Another relatively quick and easy curry that makes use of minced meat, or keema to give it its Hindi name.

Here minced lamb is given the “Buffad” treatment – seasoned and flavoured with aromatic spices such as cloves and cinnamon, and then simmered in lemon juice and coconut milk.

Perfect for a Friday night, when you want a nice, relaxing start to the weekend, but still fancy something beyond the ordinary.

As I show in a follow up post, one of the other merits of this dish is that any leftovers can be utilised as a filling for some delectable Indian stuffed vegetables.


 

Keema Buffad – Indian Aromatic Minced Lamb With Lemon and Coconut

Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1 kg minced lamb
  • 2 medium red onions, finely chopped
  • 5 cloves of garlic, minced
  • a 2 inch piece of ginger, peeled and finely chopped
  • 4 Jalapeno chillies, finely chopped
  • 1½ tsp turmeric
  • 1 tsp extra-hot chilli powder
  • 1 tsp freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 tsp cumin powder
  • 4 tsp coriander powder
  • 1 tsp cinnamon powder
  • 1 tsp ground cloves
  • juice from 2 lemons
  • 330 ml coconut milk
  • coconut oil
  • fresh coriander (cilantro)
  • salt to taste

Method

  • Take the minced lamb out of the fridge to allow it to come up to room temperature.
  • Place the turmeric, extra-hot chilli powder, freshly ground black pepper, cumin powder, coriander powder, cinnamon powder, and ground cloves into a small bowl. Add salt to taste. Mix well. Add just enough water to make a thin paste. Set aside.
  • Heat about 4 tbsp of coconut oil over medium heat in a large pan. Add the onion. Stir fry for 5 minutes.
  • Add the ginger and Jalapeno chillies. Stir fry for a further 3 minutes.
  • Add the garlic. Stir fry for a further 2 minutes.
  • Add the water and spice paste. Stir well, and continue to fry for a minute or so. Add the minced lamb. Stir well to coat with the spices and vegetbles. Stir fry until the mince has lost its raw colour, about 5 minutes or so.
  • Add the lemon juice and the coconut milk. Stir well, return to a simmer, and cook until the mince is tender and the sauce reduced, about 30 minutes or so.
  • Serve, garnished liberally with chopped fresh coriander.

Operation Wind-down – keema with root vegetable purée

keema and root vegetable purée

keema and root vegetable purée

I’m on the move…!

In two weeks time, I’ll be on a boat heading, or so I sincerely hope, in the general direction of Esbjerg in Denmark, which is but a short train journey from Copenhagen, which in turn is a very short train ride over a very long bridge away from the Swedish City of Malmö, my home. 

As part of the moving process, I’ll be disposing of the fridge-freezer at my current place in England, which means of course that I’ll have to empty it first! Cue Operation Wind-down, an on-going exercise to take all the stuff in the freezer, and get rid of it, in as cost-effective and enjoyable a way as humanly possible. It’s kind of like culinary “Tetris”, a challenge to mix and match ingredients and leftovers into a cohesive shape or whole, something you can actually chew, swallow, and then smile about afterwards.

I think I started off reasonably well, with some leftover keema, which I served up on a simple bed of puréed carrot and swede (rutabaga), which rather handily I also had in the freezer compartment – just enough, in fact, to make up a generous portion for 1. Perfect.

Mashed swede and carrot when paired with any kind of minced meat dish, never mind a wonderfully spicy one such as a keema, is, I think, a marriage made in heaven. Flavours and textures just seem to contrast in an interesting way, and yet compliment each other, too. There I go again, waxing lyrical about frozen leftovers and bag-ends, zapped until warm in a microwave. To be fair though, they were exceptionally tasty frozen leftovers and bag-ends.

As you may be able to make out in the photo above, I was serving this dish in a karahi that I found for sale as one of a pair in a local charity shop. They are restaurant quality, 8 inches in size, and copper bottomed, the real deal, and yet I paid a mere £1.98 for the 2 of them! 

Tomorrow, Operation Wind-down will be sticking with Indian food – I have a portion of sauce left over from a recent korma, a batch of frozen prawns screaming “eat us, eat us!”, and plenty of frozen spinach to use up.

This simply works on so many levels, and ticks so many boxes, that it makes me all giddy just thinking about it, so if you’ll excuse me I’ll just nip off and do a quick happy jig around the kitchen instead…

Keema with aubergine

keema with aubergine

keema with aubergine

Another recipe from my all-time list of favourite Indian dishes, a keema, or minced meat curry.

In his cookbook “The New Curry Bible”  author and expert on all things “curry” Pat Chapman  ponders as to why such a classic curry as the keema is not more popular than it is, detailing in the process this wonderful dish’s many merits – it’s low cost, great flavour, ease of preparation, etc.

Traditionally, a keema would be made with minced lamb or mutton for religious reasons, but here for convenience I have opted for minced beef.

A casual reading of the list of ingredients would probably be enough to make a purist flinch – this version is cobbled together from various culinary traditions and techniques found on the sub-continent, so whilst not exactly orthodox, it’s one that I personally like.

With such a rich dish as this, I tend to choose a relatively simple side dish – cauliflower rice would be perfect, for example.


 

Ingredients

  • 1 red onion, finely diced
  • 2 inch piece ginger, finely diced
  • 6 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 large Habanero chillies, minced
  • 2 tbsp dried curry leaves
  • 2 tbsp Panch Poran
  • 1 heaped tsp dried fenugreek leaves
  • 1 heaped tsp smoked Spanish paprika
  • 3 tbsp curry powder of your choice – I use a “Hot Madras” blend here
  • 400g minced meat
  • about 2 tbsp tomato purée 
  • 1 medium aubergine, sliced into about quarter-inch thick rounds
  • plenty of fresh coriander (cilantro) to garnish
  • Coconut oil for frying and grilling

Method

  • Heat about 2 tablespoons of coconut oil in a large non-stick pan over medium heat.
  • When the oil is hot, add the Panch Poran, and fry for a few seconds. Add the onions and dried curry leaves. Fry for about 2 minutes or so.
  • Add the ginger and chillies. Fry for a further 2 minutes.
  • Add the garlic. Fry for a further 2 minutes.
  • Add the curry powder, the smoked Spanish paprika, and the dried fenugreek leaves. Continue to fry for 2 minutes. By this time you may have to keep adding a splash of water from time to time, to stop things sticking to the pan.
  • Add the meat to the pan, stirring well to ensure it is well coated with the spices and vegetables. When the meat has lost its raw colour, add just enough water to give the meat enough liquid to simmer in, cover and simmer for about 20 minutes or so.
  • While the meat is cooking, prepare the aubergine. Heat up a non-stick frying pan, lightly brush the aubergine slices with coconut oil, and fry on medium heat until tender and golden. Set to one side.
  • Once the meat is thoroughly cooked, add the tomato purée and simmer until the sauce has thickened nicely. Add the aubergine slices, stir well, and continue to simmer until the aubergine is re-heated. Serve.